A day after a month

by amy sharp


I go the gym and ride the stationary bike on the random hill setting. I do this for 45 mins and I listen to dirty rap. Sweat is a river in my pants. Sometimes I raise my hands above my head like an athlete would do to stretch. I try and get my sadness to drain to the floor. To fall out of my body. Get it out of your body I whisper to myself.
It doesn’t budge.

Sometimes I just don’t trust anything at all.
Like we’re all standing on lace.
It’s delicate to the point of almost being funny.
I tell myself that I am a tiger.
I am strong and fierce and this thing under the surface of me is going to go away.
This pit of my stomach to level out.


We wave at each other from across the street.
The sun gives halos.
You see me.
Everything is like it once was.
Never again.    


A day till a month.

by amy sharp


I am walking around my well-manicured neighborhood looking for others.

People like me. But there are no middle-aged women dragging grief like a blanket down the sidewalk. There are only people on porches who are laughing and the sun is shining. There are families walking with toddlers in wagons and they are tan and beautiful. I am the only one who has drank two cold beers at in the middle of the day. I am dressed like a teen goth. I look like my sadness. I am my sadness.
I don’t call my friends because this feels very awkward and something that should be done in private.

This feels like I can’t get it all the way out of me.
I am sure the librarian silently judges me from my stack of reserved self-help books that I pick up. I have known this person for a long time. Familiar strangers. And she knows I am fucked up by all of the books I reserve. Feminist theory books touching diet books touching poetry collections and now this. I am ready to read words that will make me less afraid of everything. I want to be bulletproof. Strong again. I want you not to be dead. I look the librarian in the eye like I love her. Her green eyes look away. People don’t like it when you want them. I want her. Like I want her to take me in her arms and hold me and tell me she knows everything will be ok. In the middle of the library. Where every story has ever been told. Where anything is possible.


baby teeth

by amy sharp


my son is about to lose his first tooth
by miracle
the tiniest root
like a tether
holds it to his gum
he can actually twist it
make it move all around
his smile is about to morph
into the mouth of a big boy
a spread of teeth
and tongue
and pink gums
that announce to the world
his new place
in the order of things

My son is worried about blood and pain but interested in money and fairies and mythology. Where are all the teeth? Is she real? Is there a tooth mountain?

I’ve held so many small teeth in the palm of my hand.

When I was moving out of my childhood house I found glassine envelopes with all of my baby teeth in them and I looked at them for a long time. I held them to the light. I took them with me when I left.

I expect him to come home from school soon with a tiny tooth in his backpack.
I expect I will have to accept this, but right now there is still a tiny cord holding it all together. There is a place in his mouth where his babyhood is alive for a few more days. I live there. We both do.


what does the edge of depression look like

by amy sharp


 

 

6 drinks on a Monday

 

the sofa

one corner littered with blankets

dirty socks

 

the fake nod to a very good friend

that everything

is good

so busy

so good

 

walking slowly

down High street

affected suddenly

by the sunlight

the buzz all around you

 

you are a magnet

you are a valley

people pass

 

is it the lists you make

in good faith

but find at the bottom of your bag

 

or the voice in your head

the one you have known since you were young

maybe it is your voice

but it sounds so mean and underwater

you are not enough

you have really messed these past years up

 

or maybe it’s standing in line for coffee

and you just want to be somewhere else

always somewhere else

 

I pull my toe back

flex it

I don’t know about you

but I see the line

I’m walking it like a curb

like a little kid

who certainly don’t wanna step on a crack

break his mama’s back


Heartbreak Happy Hour

by amy sharp


I want to start an interview series. We sit in a bar together and drink cheap beer and you tell me every single time your heart has been broken. I write a poem.

Sign up in comments. Leave an email. We'll get you an appointment. I am going to do this all summer. Maybe it's art. Maybe it's just what we need.